Secrets Of Rent Arrears

Rent arrears Getting into rent arrears can be distressing. But don’t ignore the situation. If you don’t take action to pay back what you owe, you could end up losing your home. Read these pages to find out what you can do to stop yourself being evicted for rent arrears. Dealing with rent arrears Check you’re responsible for paying rent arrears, find a way of affordably repaying them and make sure you’re getting all the help you’re entitled to. Paying off your rent arrears – overview What you can do to help pay off your rent arrears. Paying off your rent arrears Information about rent arrears and how to pay them back, including sources of help, talking to your landlord, checking whether the amount of rent you have to pay is correct and agreeing a repayment plan. You are taken to court for rent arrears Information about the procedure a landlord must follow in order to take a tenant to court for rent arrears, special rules for social housing landlords, notice periods, what happens and a court hearing and the type of orders a judge can make. Eviction for rent arrears Details of the various types of possession orders that a judge can grant a landlord in order to evict their tenant. Also covers what happens if the tenant does not leave by the date on the possession order, warrants of possession and eviction by bailiffs.

Dealing with rent arrears Check you’re responsible for paying rent arrears, find a way of affordably repaying them and make sure you’re getting all the help you’re entitled to. Paying off your rent arrears – overview What you can do to help pay off your rent arrears. Paying off your rent arrears Information about rent arrears and how to pay them back, including sources of help, talking to your landlord, checking whether the amount of rent you have to pay is correct and agreeing a repayment plan. You are taken to court for rent arrears Information about the procedure a landlord must follow in order to take a tenant to court for rent arrears, special rules for social housing landlords, notice periods, what happens and a court hearing and the type of orders a judge can make. Eviction for rent arrears Details of the various types of possession orders that a judge can grant a landlord in order to evict their tenant. Also covers what happens if the tenant does not leave by the date on the possession order, warrants of possession and eviction by bailiffs.

Although dealing with rent arrears can be tough, you should take action as quickly as possible. If you ignore your arrears, the problem will only get worse.

If you signed a tenancy agreement with someone else when you moved in, you’ll have a ‘joint tenancy’. This could be, for example, your partner or flatmates. Together you’ll be responsible for paying all of the arrears. If one tenant doesn’t pay their arrears, you’ll have to pay for them.

If your landlord asks you to pay someone else’s arrears and you don’t think you’re responsible, remind your landlord when you moved in. Explain the arrears aren’t yours. It’s a good idea to have your tenancy agreement or statement of terms handy, so you can prove when your tenancy started.

You’d add this to your usual monthly rent of £600, so over the next 6 months you’d pay your landlord £700 a month. As long as you keep up with your repayments, you’ll be out of rent arrears after the 6th month.

If your landlord agrees to a repayment plan, it’s a good idea to write the plan down and sign it. Get your landlord to sign it too if possible, so it’s clear what you’ve both agreed to.

If your landlord won’t accept smaller payments, save the money and make a note of how much you suggested paying. This could help you if your landlord decides to take action, by showing that you’re trying to repay what you can.

You usually pay £600 a month in rent. Last month you missed your payment – and now your landlord is calling and emailing you for the money. Instead of paying £600 back all at once, you could contact your landlord and ask them if you can pay them back in 6 monthly payments of £100. You’d add this to your usual monthly rent of £600, so over the next 6 months you’d pay your landlord £700 a month. As long as you keep up with your repayments, you’ll be out of rent arrears after the 6th month.

If your rent is not paid, the money owed is called ‘rent arrears’. Rent arrears are ‘priority debts’, which means the consequences of not dealing with them are serious – there is a risk of eviction.

If you can’t pay your rent, you have missed rent payments or you’re worried your payments are not being made, sort things out as soon as you can. Even if you have other debts, make sure you prioritise rent arrears.

Sometimes, rent arrears arise as a result of problems with claiming and processing Housing Benefit and other entitlements. If your Housing Benefit hasn’t been paid, contact the Housing Executive to find out what’s happening.

If you’re on a low income, or having financial problems, check if you qualify for any benefits – such as Housing Benefit or tax credits. You don’t have to be out of work to claim benefits and you could qualify for more than one.

Rent arrears If your rent is not paid, the money owed is called ‘rent arrears’. Rent arrears are ‘priority debts’, which means the consequences of not dealing with them are serious – there is a risk of eviction. Dealing with rent arrears If you can’t pay your rent, you have missed rent payments or you’re worried your payments are not being made, sort things out as soon as you can. Even if you have other debts, make sure you prioritise rent arrears. Things to do to help you get back on track: make a list of all your debts and put them in order of priority write down all your income and expenses – then see how much you’ve got to pay your debts work out how much you can afford to pay to each creditor (a person or organisation you owe money to) consider seeking advice from a debt advice agency such as National Debtline most importantly, talk to your landlord – try to reach an agreement about paying off the arrears, but don’t agree to pay more than you can afford – one way to do this is through an agreed debt management plan Remember that once your rent is being paid in full again, the arrears that have built up will still have to be paid off. Dealing with debt problems – a guide Arrears caused by Housing Benefit problems Sometimes, rent arrears arise as a result of problems with claiming and processing Housing Benefit and other entitlements. If your Housing Benefit hasn’t been paid, contact the Housing Executive to find out what’s happening. There could be a backlog, or the Housing Executive might need more information to deal with your claim. Do seek advice from your landlord or an independent adviser who may be able to assist you with making a claim; incomplete paperwork will hold up your claims. Tell your landlord what’s going on and keep any correspondence. Find your local Housing Executive office – NIHE Help with paying your rent If you’re on a low income, or having financial problems, check if you qualify for any benefits – such as Housing Benefit or tax credits. You don’t have to be out of work to claim benefits and you could qualify for more than one. Even if you already receive Housing Benefit, if it doesn’t cover your rent you may be able to get some extra money – called ‘discretionary housing payment’. Contact the Housing Executive to see if you qualify. You should also consider seeking advice from a debt advice agency, which should be able to advise you on how to maximise your benefits and about any additional benefits you may be able to claim. They may also be able to assist you with filling out the forms and ensuring that any claims are not held up by incomplete paperwork. How to find out if you qualify for benefits Housing Benefit/Rate Relief What can happen if you don’t pay your rent Landlords usually have the right to seek a court order to evict you for rent arrears. The rules about when and how a landlord may evict you for rent arrears differ according to the type of tenancy agreement you have. The type of tenancy agreement you have will depend partly on who your landlord is. To find out more about how different types of tenancy agreement affect what happens if you don’t pay your rent visit the links below, or seek free, independent advice. Private rent and tenancies Help and advice You can get free, independent advice about rent problems from several organisations. Housing advice centres Housing advice centres offer help with all housing matters. They’re run by local authorities or voluntary organisations. Housing Advice NI Advice NI Advice NI offers free, confidential advice face-to-face or by phone. Advice NI More useful links Housing Executive tenant rent arrears Avoiding debt – Housing Executive Legal aid schemes Protection against eviction Getting help with problems in private rented housing National Debtline.

If your rent is not paid, the money owed is called ‘rent arrears’. Rent arrears are ‘priority debts’, which means the consequences of not dealing with them are serious – there is a risk of eviction. Dealing with rent arrears If you can’t pay your rent, you have missed rent payments or you’re worried your payments are not being made, sort things out as soon as you can. Even if you have other debts, make sure you prioritise rent arrears. Things to do to help you get back on track: make a list of all your debts and put them in order of priority write down all your income and expenses – then see how much you’ve got to pay your debts work out how much you can afford to pay to each creditor (a person or organisation you owe money to) consider seeking advice from a debt advice agency such as National Debtline most importantly, talk to your landlord – try to reach an agreement about paying off the arrears, but don’t agree to pay more than you can afford – one way to do this is through an agreed debt management plan Remember that once your rent is being paid in full again, the arrears that have built up will still have to be paid off. Dealing with debt problems – a guide Arrears caused by Housing Benefit problems Sometimes, rent arrears arise as a result of problems with claiming and processing Housing Benefit and other entitlements. If your Housing Benefit hasn’t been paid, contact the Housing Executive to find out what’s happening. There could be a backlog, or the Housing Executive might need more information to deal with your claim. Do seek advice from your landlord or an independent adviser who may be able to assist you with making a claim; incomplete paperwork will hold up your claims. Tell your landlord what’s going on and keep any correspondence. Find your local Housing Executive office – NIHE Help with paying your rent If you’re on a low income, or having financial problems, check if you qualify for any benefits – such as Housing Benefit or tax credits. You don’t have to be out of work to claim benefits and you could qualify for more than one. Even if you already receive Housing Benefit, if it doesn’t cover your rent you may be able to get some extra money – called ‘discretionary housing payment’. Contact the Housing Executive to see if you qualify. You should also consider seeking advice from a debt advice agency, which should be able to advise you on how to maximise your benefits and about any additional benefits you may be able to claim. They may also be able to assist you with filling out the forms and ensuring that any claims are not held up by incomplete paperwork. How to find out if you qualify for benefits Housing Benefit/Rate Relief What can happen if you don’t pay your rent Landlords usually have the right to seek a court order to evict you for rent arrears. The rules about when and how a landlord may evict you for rent arrears differ according to the type of tenancy agreement you have. The type of tenancy agreement you have will depend partly on who your landlord is. To find out more about how different types of tenancy agreement affect what happens if you don’t pay your rent visit the links below, or seek free, independent advice. Private rent and tenancies Help and advice You can get free, independent advice about rent problems from several organisations. Housing advice centres Housing advice centres offer help with all housing matters. They’re run by local authorities or voluntary organisations. Housing Advice NI Advice NI Advice NI offers free, confidential advice face-to-face or by phone. Advice NI More useful links Housing Executive tenant rent arrears Avoiding debt – Housing Executive Legal aid schemes Protection against eviction Getting help with problems in private rented housing National Debtline.

Dealing with rent arrears If you can’t pay your rent, you have missed rent payments or you’re worried your payments are not being made, sort things out as soon as you can. Even if you have other debts, make sure you prioritise rent arrears. Things to do to help you get back on track: make a list of all your debts and put them in order of priority write down all your income and expenses – then see how much you’ve got to pay your debts work out how much you can afford to pay to each creditor (a person or organisation you owe money to) consider seeking advice from a debt advice agency such as National Debtline most importantly, talk to your landlord – try to reach an agreement about paying off the arrears, but don’t agree to pay more than you can afford – one way to do this is through an agreed debt management plan Remember that once your rent is being paid in full again, the arrears that have built up will still have to be paid off. Dealing with debt problems – a guide Arrears caused by Housing Benefit problems Sometimes, rent arrears arise as a result of problems with claiming and processing Housing Benefit and other entitlements. If your Housing Benefit hasn’t been paid, contact the Housing Executive to find out what’s happening. There could be a backlog, or the Housing Executive might need more information to deal with your claim. Do seek advice from your landlord or an independent adviser who may be able to assist you with making a claim; incomplete paperwork will hold up your claims. Tell your landlord what’s going on and keep any correspondence. Find your local Housing Executive office – NIHE Help with paying your rent If you’re on a low income, or having financial problems, check if you qualify for any benefits – such as Housing Benefit or tax credits. You don’t have to be out of work to claim benefits and you could qualify for more than one. Even if you already receive Housing Benefit, if it doesn’t cover your rent you may be able to get some extra money – called ‘discretionary housing payment’. Contact the Housing Executive to see if you qualify. You should also consider seeking advice from a debt advice agency, which should be able to advise you on how to maximise your benefits and about any additional benefits you may be able to claim. They may also be able to assist you with filling out the forms and ensuring that any claims are not held up by incomplete paperwork. How to find out if you qualify for benefits Housing Benefit/Rate Relief What can happen if you don’t pay your rent Landlords usually have the right to seek a court order to evict you for rent arrears. The rules about when and how a landlord may evict you for rent arrears differ according to the type of tenancy agreement you have. The type of tenancy agreement you have will depend partly on who your landlord is. To find out more about how different types of tenancy agreement affect what happens if you don’t pay your rent visit the links below, or seek free, independent advice. Private rent and tenancies Help and advice You can get free, independent advice about rent problems from several organisations. Housing advice centres Housing advice centres offer help with all housing matters. They’re run by local authorities or voluntary organisations. Housing Advice NI Advice NI Advice NI offers free, confidential advice face-to-face or by phone. Advice NI More useful links Housing Executive tenant rent arrears Avoiding debt – Housing Executive Legal aid schemes Protection against eviction Getting help with problems in private rented housing National Debtline.

We will not reply to your feedback. Don’t include any personal or financial information, for example National Insurance, credit card numbers, or phone numbers. This feedback form is for issues with the nidirect website only. You can use it to report a problem or suggest an improvement to a webpage. If you have a question about a government service or policy, you should contact the relevant government organisation directly as we don’t have access to information about you held by government departments. You must be aged 13 years or older – if you’re younger, ask someone with parental responsibility to send the feedback for you. The nidirect privacy notice applies to any information you send on this feedback form. Don’t include any personal or financial information, for example National Insurance, credit card numbers, or phone numbers. Enter your feedback * Plain text only, 750 characters maximum. Enter your question * Plain text only, 750 characters maximum.

This feedback form is for issues with the nidirect website only. You can use it to report a problem or suggest an improvement to a webpage. If you have a question about a government service or policy, you should contact the relevant government organisation directly as we don’t have access to information about you held by government departments. You must be aged 13 years or older – if you’re younger, ask someone with parental responsibility to send the feedback for you. The nidirect privacy notice applies to any information you send on this feedback form.

What to do next If you have a comment or query about benefits, you will need to contact the government department or agency which handles that benefit. Contacts for common benefits are listed below. Carer’s Allowance Call 0800 587 0912Email [email protected] Discretionary support / Short-term benefit advance Call 0800 587 2750 Email [email protected] Disability Living Allowance Call 0800 587 0912 Email [email protected] Employment and Support Allowance Call 0800 587 1377 Jobseeker’s Allowance Contact your local Jobs & Benefits office Personal Independence Payment Call 0800 587 0932 If your query is about another benefit, select ‘Other’ from the drop-down menu above.

Arrears (or arrearage) is a legal term for the part of a debt that is overdue after missing one or more required payments.[1] The amount of the arrears is the amount accrued from the date on which the first missed payment was due. The term is usually used in relation with periodically recurring payments such as rent, bills, royalties (or other contractual payments), and child support.

Payment in arrear is a payment made after a service has been provided, as distinct from in advance, which are payments made at the start of a period.[2] For instance, rent is usually paid in advance, but mortgages in arrear (the interest for the period is due at the end of the period). Employees’ salaries are usually paid in arrear. Payment at the end of a period is referred to by the singular arrear, to distinguish from past due payments. For example, a housing tenant who is obliged to pay rent at the end of each month, is said to pay rent in arrear, while a tenant who has not paid rental due for 30 days is said to be one month in arrears. Precise usage may differ slightly (e.g. “in arrear” or “in arrears” for the same situation) in different countries.

The word arrears is used to mean “past due” when describing the past, omitted dividends on cumulative preferred stock. If a corporation fails to declare the preferred dividend, those dividends are said to be in arrears. The dividends in arrears must be disclosed in the notes (footnotes) to the financial statements. (Cumulative preferred stock requires that any past, omitted dividends must be paid to the preferred stockholders before the common stockholders will be paid any dividend.).

The word arrears is used to mean “end of period” when referring to annuities (an annuity is series of equal amounts occurring at equal time intervals, such as £1,000 per month for 20 years). If the recurring amount comes at the end of each period, the annuity is described as an annuity in arrears or as an ordinary annuity. A loan repayment schedule is usually an annuity in arrears. For example, you borrow £10,000 on September 30 and your first monthly payment will be due on October 31, the second payment will be due on November 30, and so on.

An in-arrears swap is an interest rate swap that sets (fixes) the interest rate and pays the interest at the end of the coupon period. In contrast, a standard swap sets the interest rate in advance, at the beginning of the coupon period, and pays the interest in arrears, at the end of the coupon period. The same distinction holds for other interest rate derivatives, e.g. caps, floors and swaptions.

Payday loans aren’t the only option if you need money urgently. You might be able to get a budgeting loan, hardship payment, short term benefit advance, or even a grant.

If you are struggling with debt, there is help available. Find out how to deal with existing debt, and how to manage money to make it last, using our factsheets below.

Gingerbread, the charity for single parent families, is registered in England and Wales as a company limited by guarantee, no. 402748, and a registered charity, no.

Money in an emergency Payday loans aren’t the only option if you need money urgently. You might be able to get a budgeting loan, hardship payment, short term benefit advance, or even a grant. Find out about all these options, plus links to debt advice and money saving tips from Gingerbread members below.

Get help in an emergency Local welfare assistance schemes Short term benefit advance Hardship payments (after a sanction) Find a local foodbank Help paying rent If you are already receiving housing benefits, but you’re still struggling to pay or facing rent arrears, you can apply for a discretionary housing payment. Find out more about DHP Managing debt If you are struggling with debt, there is help available. Find out how to deal with existing debt, and how to manage money to make it last, using our factsheets below. Dealing with debt Making ends meet.

Managing debt If you are struggling with debt, there is help available. Find out how to deal with existing debt, and how to manage money to make it last, using our factsheets below. Dealing with debt Making ends meet.

Universal credit replaces six benefits, including housing benefit, and merges them into one payment. It’s gradually being introduced but there are concerns that some claimants have seen their overall support cut.

If you don’t make sufficient payments towards your rent arrears, your landlord can try to evict you.They must follow legal procedures,which are dependant on your tenancy type.

We’re fighting for a Scotland where no one chooses between food and rent, and no one sleeps on the streets. Are you with us? We’re fighting for a Scotland where no one chooses between food and rent, and no one sleeps on the streets. Are you with us?.

We’re fighting for a Scotland where no one chooses between food and rent, and no one sleeps on the streets. Are you with us? We’re fighting for a Scotland where no one chooses between food and rent, and no one sleeps on the streets.

Dealing with rent arrears It is important to act quickly if you have rent arrears, to prevent your rent arrears getting bigger and to avoid your landlord trying to evict you. This page tells you what to do if Debt Arrangement Scheme and rent arrears To help pay off your rent arrears you might be able to apply for a debt payment programme under the Debt Arrangement Scheme. Find out about the Debt Arrangement Scheme here. Deductions from benefits If you get income support, JSA, employment and support allowance or pension credit and you have rent arrears, payments towards your arrears can be deducted directly from your benefit. Rent arrears and housing benefit not being paid in time Problems with your claim for housing benefit not being paid in time can lead to rent arrears. Find out what you can do if you are in this situation. Eviction because of rent arrears If you don’t make sufficient payments towards your rent arrears, your landlord can try to evict you.They must follow legal procedures,which are dependant on your tenancy type.

Eviction because of rent arrears If you don’t make sufficient payments towards your rent arrears, your landlord can try to evict you.They must follow legal procedures,which are dependant on your tenancy type.

The Welfare Rights Team is available to ensure that the residents of Perth and Kinross are not missing out on their entitlement to benefits and other related help. The team provides a free, confidential and impartial benefits advice, information and appeal representation service. Call them on 01738 476900 or email [email protected]

If for some reason you cannot keep an agreement, contact your local Housing Officer immediately. They will understand if something unforeseen has occurred that prevents you from making an agreed payment, but always try to offer some level of payment.

Rent arrears What happens if you have a problem paying rent If you are having difficulty paying your rent, it is very important that you contact us straight away. One of our Housing Officers will discuss your rent account with you, either in a local Housing office or in your own home. They will listen to any problem you may have and wherever possible will work with you to resolve any difficulties by agreeing an arrangement with you to pay an amount you can afford. For more information about how to avoid rent arrears please read our leaflet: How to avoid rent arrears (pdf 430kb) What happens if you break a repayment agreement If for some reason you cannot keep an agreement, contact your local Housing Officer immediately. They will understand if something unforeseen has occurred that prevents you from making an agreed payment, but always try to offer some level of payment. What happens if you don’t pay rent If you fall behind with your rent, you should contact your local Housing office immediately for help and advice. You will be able to talk to an Housing Officer and come to an agreement to clear the amount due. It is important for you to take action as soon as possible before the arrears become more difficult for you to clear. If you do not contact us, we will write to you stating the level of rent arrears and requesting that you get in contact with a Housing Officer immediately. If you continue not to pay or your rent arrears increases an Housing Officer will call at your home. They will discuss with you how to reduce the arrears. We may need to take legal action if we cannot discuss your account with you, or you break an agreement and your arrears continue to increase. Share this information Share this page on Facebook Share this page on Twitter Share this page on LinkedIn.

Rent arrears What happens if you have a problem paying rent If you are having difficulty paying your rent, it is very important that you contact us straight away. One of our Housing Officers will discuss your rent account with you, either in a local Housing office or in your own home. They will listen to any problem you may have and wherever possible will work with you to resolve any difficulties by agreeing an arrangement with you to pay an amount you can afford. For more information about how to avoid rent arrears please read our leaflet: How to avoid rent arrears (pdf 430kb) What happens if you break a repayment agreement If for some reason you cannot keep an agreement, contact your local Housing Officer immediately. They will understand if something unforeseen has occurred that prevents you from making an agreed payment, but always try to offer some level of payment. What happens if you don’t pay rent If you fall behind with your rent, you should contact your local Housing office immediately for help and advice. You will be able to talk to an Housing Officer and come to an agreement to clear the amount due. It is important for you to take action as soon as possible before the arrears become more difficult for you to clear. If you do not contact us, we will write to you stating the level of rent arrears and requesting that you get in contact with a Housing Officer immediately. If you continue not to pay or your rent arrears increases an Housing Officer will call at your home. They will discuss with you how to reduce the arrears. We may need to take legal action if we cannot discuss your account with you, or you break an agreement and your arrears continue to increase.

Falling into rent arrears can happen to anybody, but with the right support behind you, a solution can often be found. Don’t feel you have to deal with the situation on your own. We can support you to manage your money through guidance on budgeting, help with benefits, access to free debt advice, affordable loans, or simply by agreeing a plan for repayment.

Missing a rent payment can happen for a number of reasons; maybe you were faced with an unexpected bill or an illness in the family meaning you were unable to work, or maybe you are experiencing problems with your benefit payments. Whatever the reason, if you’re struggling to make ends meet it’s essential that you contact us so we can help you find a solution depending on your personal circumstances. Please contact us via Customer Services.

Remember, if you’re struggling with money you must avoid borrowing from pay day or doorstep lenders. These lenders charge excessive levels of interest, which will only push you further into debt. Get in touch with us and we will be able to suggest alternatives.

Once you have spoken to one of our team, they will be able to talk you through your options. This could include putting together a repayment plan, or referring you to someone who can support you with any challenges you may be facing.

Staying in control of your money can be challenging, especially when you have multiple bills to pay each month. One of the best ways to keep on top of your outgoings is via a budget. This will allow you to calculate how much money you have coming in a month and how much money you should set aside for rent, services charges and other bills.

To help with this, Clarion Futures have put together two budget planners along with some guidance on managing your money. But if you would like to talk through your money situation confidentially, you can also contact Guideline.

If someone consistently fails to make payments or ensure their rent is paid, they can be subject to further action including telephone calls, court hearings and eviction as a very last resort. Other people who have rent arrears may well be going through this process without you being aware of it.

Rent and service charges Ways to pay your rent Service charges Falling into arrears Eviction FAQs Universal credit How we invest Online rent statement Falling into arrears Falling into rent arrears can happen to anybody, but with the right support behind you, a solution can often be found. Don’t feel you have to deal with the situation on your own. We can support you to manage your money through guidance on budgeting, help with benefits, access to free debt advice, affordable loans, or simply by agreeing a plan for repayment. What can I do if I am having trouble paying my rent? Missing a rent payment can happen for a number of reasons; maybe you were faced with an unexpected bill or an illness in the family meaning you were unable to work, or maybe you are experiencing problems with your benefit payments. Whatever the reason, if you’re struggling to make ends meet it’s essential that you contact us so we can help you find a solution depending on your personal circumstances. Please contact us via Customer Services. Remember, if you’re struggling with money you must avoid borrowing from pay day or doorstep lenders. These lenders charge excessive levels of interest, which will only push you further into debt. Get in touch with us and we will be able to suggest alternatives. What sort of help can Clarion offer? Once you have spoken to one of our team, they will be able to talk you through your options. This could include putting together a repayment plan, or referring you to someone who can support you with any challenges you may be facing. When you get in touch, our team will talk to you about why you’ve been unable to pay your rent so we can provide the right support. It is important that you are upfront about why you aren’t able to pay to avoid any further action. Our Welfare Benefit Advisers will be able to support you with a range of benefits issues, while our team at Clarion Futures will be able to offer support with budgeting and other services. If you’d like to talk about the support we offer, make an appointment with Clarion Futures Money Guidance team who are available by phone, Monday to Friday 9-5pm. Make an appointment If you’d like to talk to a Welfare Benefit Adviser, contact Customer Services first. You may be entitled to benefits depending on your personal circumstances. Our benefits calculator can help you identify exactly what you are entitled to receive. Benefits calculator How can I manage my money efficiently? Staying in control of your money can be challenging, especially when you have multiple bills to pay each month. One of the best ways to keep on top of your outgoings is via a budget. This will allow you to calculate how much money you have coming in a month and how much money you should set aside for rent, services charges and other bills. To help with this, Clarion Futures have put together two budget planners along with some guidance on managing your money. But if you would like to talk through your money situation confidentially, you can also contact Guideline. Frequently asked questions What should I do if I think there is a mistake on my rent account? Get in touch with us as soon as possible and we’ll be able to take a look at your account and help sort out any problems. If a payment you made is not showing, you’ll need to provide evidence of the payment. Then we can investigate the issue to make sure your account is updated with the correct amount. Why am I being chased for small rent arrears when I know other people owe much more? We will contact anyone who is in arrears, whatever that amount is. We have a responsibility to manage accounts effectively to prevent you getting further into debt. If someone consistently fails to make payments or ensure their rent is paid, they can be subject to further action including telephone calls, court hearings and eviction as a very last resort. Other people who have rent arrears may well be going through this process without you being aware of it. If you have rent arrears, small or large, please do contact us so we can put you in touch with a Customer Account Specialist to make arrangements to bring your account back up to date. Why have I been sent an arrears letter if I have applied for Housing Benefit or Universal Credit? You are responsible for paying your rent. If your Housing Benefit or Universal Credit has not been paid, you are responsible for ensuring that your claim is in payment. It is important that you keep us informed of any delays or challenges that you may be facing, so we can discuss the next steps with you. If you do not keep us up to date and your rent remains unpaid, it is likely that we will take court action against you. Always get in touch if you are struggling with payments, or if you need any support in resolving your benefit claim. Why does my rent statement show arrears when I do not pay rent and am on full or partial benefits? Housing Benefit is usually paid four weeks in arrears. As your rent is charged weekly or monthly depending on your tenancy agreement, your account may be in arrears between Housing Benefit payments. You should make payments to ensure your rent account is paid in advance at all times. Please remember, when we send the rent statements, they will state the amount outstanding at the time they are printed, without taking into account what payments may be due, or those that have been paid after this date. If you have any concerns at all, then get in touch. What will happen if the arrears on my account continue to rise? If you don’t contact us to discuss how to pay your rent, and the arrears on your account continue to rise, we will have to start enforcement actions to ensure we manage this effectively; preventing you from getting further into debt. We only evict tenants as a last resort and it isn’t an action we take lightly. However, we would urge you to get in touch as soon as you feel concerned about your financial situation, so we can prevent further action. Will Universal Credit change anything? If you currently receive benefits, instead of getting these separately, you’ll receive a single monthly payment, in arrears, directly into your bank account. This will include the money for your rent. You may be used to having Housing Benefit paid directly to us as your landlord – this will not happen when you get Universal Credit. You will be responsible for using your monthly payment to pay your rent. Setting up a direct debit from your bank account is the best way to ensure your rent and other important bills are paid on time. More on Universal credit Money and digital We help our customers manage their money more effectively and provide an extensive programme to support you to get online.

Falling into arrears Falling into rent arrears can happen to anybody, but with the right support behind you, a solution can often be found. Don’t feel you have to deal with the situation on your own. We can support you to manage your money through guidance on budgeting, help with benefits, access to free debt advice, affordable loans, or simply by agreeing a plan for repayment. What can I do if I am having trouble paying my rent? Missing a rent payment can happen for a number of reasons; maybe you were faced with an unexpected bill or an illness in the family meaning you were unable to work, or maybe you are experiencing problems with your benefit payments. Whatever the reason, if you’re struggling to make ends meet it’s essential that you contact us so we can help you find a solution depending on your personal circumstances. Please contact us via Customer Services. Remember, if you’re struggling with money you must avoid borrowing from pay day or doorstep lenders. These lenders charge excessive levels of interest, which will only push you further into debt. Get in touch with us and we will be able to suggest alternatives. What sort of help can Clarion offer? Once you have spoken to one of our team, they will be able to talk you through your options. This could include putting together a repayment plan, or referring you to someone who can support you with any challenges you may be facing. When you get in touch, our team will talk to you about why you’ve been unable to pay your rent so we can provide the right support. It is important that you are upfront about why you aren’t able to pay to avoid any further action. Our Welfare Benefit Advisers will be able to support you with a range of benefits issues, while our team at Clarion Futures will be able to offer support with budgeting and other services. If you’d like to talk about the support we offer, make an appointment with Clarion Futures Money Guidance team who are available by phone, Monday to Friday 9-5pm. Make an appointment If you’d like to talk to a Welfare Benefit Adviser, contact Customer Services first. You may be entitled to benefits depending on your personal circumstances. Our benefits calculator can help you identify exactly what you are entitled to receive. Benefits calculator How can I manage my money efficiently? Staying in control of your money can be challenging, especially when you have multiple bills to pay each month. One of the best ways to keep on top of your outgoings is via a budget. This will allow you to calculate how much money you have coming in a month and how much money you should set aside for rent, services charges and other bills. To help with this, Clarion Futures have put together two budget planners along with some guidance on managing your money. But if you would like to talk through your money situation confidentially, you can also contact Guideline. Frequently asked questions What should I do if I think there is a mistake on my rent account? Get in touch with us as soon as possible and we’ll be able to take a look at your account and help sort out any problems. If a payment you made is not showing, you’ll need to provide evidence of the payment. Then we can investigate the issue to make sure your account is updated with the correct amount. Why am I being chased for small rent arrears when I know other people owe much more? We will contact anyone who is in arrears, whatever that amount is. We have a responsibility to manage accounts effectively to prevent you getting further into debt. If someone consistently fails to make payments or ensure their rent is paid, they can be subject to further action including telephone calls, court hearings and eviction as a very last resort. Other people who have rent arrears may well be going through this process without you being aware of it. If you have rent arrears, small or large, please do contact us so we can put you in touch with a Customer Account Specialist to make arrangements to bring your account back up to date. Why have I been sent an arrears letter if I have applied for Housing Benefit or Universal Credit? You are responsible for paying your rent. If your Housing Benefit or Universal Credit has not been paid, you are responsible for ensuring that your claim is in payment. It is important that you keep us informed of any delays or challenges that you may be facing, so we can discuss the next steps with you. If you do not keep us up to date and your rent remains unpaid, it is likely that we will take court action against you. Always get in touch if you are struggling with payments, or if you need any support in resolving your benefit claim. Why does my rent statement show arrears when I do not pay rent and am on full or partial benefits? Housing Benefit is usually paid four weeks in arrears. As your rent is charged weekly or monthly depending on your tenancy agreement, your account may be in arrears between Housing Benefit payments. You should make payments to ensure your rent account is paid in advance at all times. Please remember, when we send the rent statements, they will state the amount outstanding at the time they are printed, without taking into account what payments may be due, or those that have been paid after this date. If you have any concerns at all, then get in touch. What will happen if the arrears on my account continue to rise? If you don’t contact us to discuss how to pay your rent, and the arrears on your account continue to rise, we will have to start enforcement actions to ensure we manage this effectively; preventing you from getting further into debt. We only evict tenants as a last resort and it isn’t an action we take lightly. However, we would urge you to get in touch as soon as you feel concerned about your financial situation, so we can prevent further action. Will Universal Credit change anything? If you currently receive benefits, instead of getting these separately, you’ll receive a single monthly payment, in arrears, directly into your bank account. This will include the money for your rent. You may be used to having Housing Benefit paid directly to us as your landlord – this will not happen when you get Universal Credit. You will be responsible for using your monthly payment to pay your rent. Setting up a direct debit from your bank account is the best way to ensure your rent and other important bills are paid on time. More on Universal credit Money and digital We help our customers manage their money more effectively and provide an extensive programme to support you to get online.

Falling into arrears Falling into rent arrears can happen to anybody, but with the right support behind you, a solution can often be found. Don’t feel you have to deal with the situation on your own. We can support you to manage your money through guidance on budgeting, help with benefits, access to free debt advice, affordable loans, or simply by agreeing a plan for repayment. What can I do if I am having trouble paying my rent? Missing a rent payment can happen for a number of reasons; maybe you were faced with an unexpected bill or an illness in the family meaning you were unable to work, or maybe you are experiencing problems with your benefit payments. Whatever the reason, if you’re struggling to make ends meet it’s essential that you contact us so we can help you find a solution depending on your personal circumstances. Please contact us via Customer Services. Remember, if you’re struggling with money you must avoid borrowing from pay day or doorstep lenders. These lenders charge excessive levels of interest, which will only push you further into debt. Get in touch with us and we will be able to suggest alternatives. What sort of help can Clarion offer? Once you have spoken to one of our team, they will be able to talk you through your options. This could include putting together a repayment plan, or referring you to someone who can support you with any challenges you may be facing. When you get in touch, our team will talk to you about why you’ve been unable to pay your rent so we can provide the right support. It is important that you are upfront about why you aren’t able to pay to avoid any further action. Our Welfare Benefit Advisers will be able to support you with a range of benefits issues, while our team at Clarion Futures will be able to offer support with budgeting and other services. If you’d like to talk about the support we offer, make an appointment with Clarion Futures Money Guidance team who are available by phone, Monday to Friday 9-5pm. Make an appointment If you’d like to talk to a Welfare Benefit Adviser, contact Customer Services first. You may be entitled to benefits depending on your personal circumstances. Our benefits calculator can help you identify exactly what you are entitled to receive. Benefits calculator How can I manage my money efficiently? Staying in control of your money can be challenging, especially when you have multiple bills to pay each month. One of the best ways to keep on top of your outgoings is via a budget. This will allow you to calculate how much money you have coming in a month and how much money you should set aside for rent, services charges and other bills. To help with this, Clarion Futures have put together two budget planners along with some guidance on managing your money. But if you would like to talk through your money situation confidentially, you can also contact Guideline.

We will contact anyone who is in arrears, whatever that amount is. We have a responsibility to manage accounts effectively to prevent you getting further into debt. If someone consistently fails to make payments or ensure their rent is paid, they can be subject to further action including telephone calls, court hearings and eviction as a very last resort. Other people who have rent arrears may well be going through this process without you being aware of it. If you have rent arrears, small or large, please do contact us so we can put you in touch with a Customer Account Specialist to make arrangements to bring your account back up to date.

You are responsible for paying your rent. If your Housing Benefit or Universal Credit has not been paid, you are responsible for ensuring that your claim is in payment. It is important that you keep us informed of any delays or challenges that you may be facing, so we can discuss the next steps with you. If you do not keep us up to date and your rent remains unpaid, it is likely that we will take court action against you. Always get in touch if you are struggling with payments, or if you need any support in resolving your benefit claim.

Housing Benefit is usually paid four weeks in arrears. As your rent is charged weekly or monthly depending on your tenancy agreement, your account may be in arrears between Housing Benefit payments. You should make payments to ensure your rent account is paid in advance at all times. Please remember, when we send the rent statements, they will state the amount outstanding at the time they are printed, without taking into account what payments may be due, or those that have been paid after this date. If you have any concerns at all, then get in touch.

If you don’t contact us to discuss how to pay your rent, and the arrears on your account continue to rise, we will have to start enforcement actions to ensure we manage this effectively; preventing you from getting further into debt. We only evict tenants as a last resort and it isn’t an action we take lightly. However, we would urge you to get in touch as soon as you feel concerned about your financial situation, so we can prevent further action.

If you currently receive benefits, instead of getting these separately, you’ll receive a single monthly payment, in arrears, directly into your bank account. This will include the money for your rent. You may be used to having Housing Benefit paid directly to us as your landlord – this will not happen when you get Universal Credit. You will be responsible for using your monthly payment to pay your rent. Setting up a direct debit from your bank account is the best way to ensure your rent and other important bills are paid on time. More on Universal credit.

If we begin legal action, we will serve you with a Notice of Seeking Possession. This is a legal document stating that if you do not pay the rent you owe or make a reasonable offer to pay off your debts, we will apply to court to take possession of your home.

What happens if I receive an eviction notice? If you receive an Eviction Notice, do not ignore it, it will not go away. You can stop the eviction from going ahead if you pay all the money that you owe to us right away.

We will contact you within three days if your rent is late. If you cannot pay the overdue amount straight away, we will make a payment agreement with you. This will be your rent, plus an agreed amount to reduce the arrears.

Whilst eviction is a last resort, where arrears occur without explanation or good reason we will take early legal action. This involves serving a legal Notice and starting court action for bpha to regain possession of your home. Eviction is often avoidable but does happen, particularly when the resident who owes money does not keep in contact with us.

If you receive a Notice of Seeking Possession you have four weeks in which to start reducing your arrears by an acceptable and agreed amount. If you do not do this and fail to keep to a repayment agreement, we will apply to court to request a possession hearing. You will be notified that we have applied to court, and again when a hearing date has been arranged. At court you will have an opportunity to tell the Judge what you intend to do about your arrears.

We may request cookies to be set on your device. We use cookies to let us know when you visit our websites, how you interact with us, to enrich your user experience, and to customize your relationship with our website.

We also use different external services like Google Webfonts, Google Maps, and external Video providers. Since these providers may collect personal data like your IP address we allow you to block them here. Please be aware that this might heavily reduce the functionality and appearance of our site. Changes will take effect once you reload the page.

Rent arrears are dealt with by your Home Agent. They will contact residents who are behind with their rent and direct them towards any financial help that might be available. With your permission they will refer you for support from our Money Advice Team. Or you may wish to do this yourself. With or without the support of the Money Advice Team your Home Agent will work with you to agree realistic arrears repayments. If you are in rent arrears we will: visit you at home help you as much as possible so you can keep your home keep information about your circumstances private What happens if your rent is late We will contact you within three days if your rent is late. If you cannot pay the overdue amount straight away, we will make a payment agreement with you. This will be your rent, plus an agreed amount to reduce the arrears. We will make regular checks to ensure you are keeping to the payment agreement. You are responsible for ensuring payment reaches your account by the due date. Whilst eviction is a last resort, where arrears occur without explanation or good reason we will take early legal action. This involves serving a legal Notice and starting court action for bpha to regain possession of your home. Eviction is often avoidable but does happen, particularly when the resident who owes money does not keep in contact with us. What happens if we take court action If you receive a Notice of Seeking Possession you have four weeks in which to start reducing your arrears by an acceptable and agreed amount. If you do not do this and fail to keep to a repayment agreement, we will apply to court to request a possession hearing. You will be notified that we have applied to court, and again when a hearing date has been arranged. At court you will have an opportunity to tell the Judge what you intend to do about your arrears. bpha will consider a payment proposal made by a resident at any point before eviction is sought. If you have been evicted for rent arrears or leave your property owing rent, in most cases we will not help with future permanent rehousing until you have cleared the outstanding debt.

What happens if your rent is late We will contact you within three days if your rent is late. If you cannot pay the overdue amount straight away, we will make a payment agreement with you. This will be your rent, plus an agreed amount to reduce the arrears. We will make regular checks to ensure you are keeping to the payment agreement. You are responsible for ensuring payment reaches your account by the due date. Whilst eviction is a last resort, where arrears occur without explanation or good reason we will take early legal action. This involves serving a legal Notice and starting court action for bpha to regain possession of your home. Eviction is often avoidable but does happen, particularly when the resident who owes money does not keep in contact with us.

What happens if we take court action If you receive a Notice of Seeking Possession you have four weeks in which to start reducing your arrears by an acceptable and agreed amount. If you do not do this and fail to keep to a repayment agreement, we will apply to court to request a possession hearing. You will be notified that we have applied to court, and again when a hearing date has been arranged. At court you will have an opportunity to tell the Judge what you intend to do about your arrears. bpha will consider a payment proposal made by a resident at any point before eviction is sought. If you have been evicted for rent arrears or leave your property owing rent, in most cases we will not help with future permanent rehousing until you have cleared the outstanding debt.

We may request cookies to be set on your device. We use cookies to let us know when you visit our websites, how you interact with us, to enrich your user experience, and to customize your relationship with our website. Click on the different category headings to find out more. You can also change some of your preferences. Note that blocking some types of cookies may impact your experience on our websites and the services we are able to offer.

If you ignore letters sent or contact made from our officers, or bury your head in the sand, you could end up loosing your home. If you do not pay your rent, you cannot keep your home.

However, at all stages we want to avoid taking legal action against you, and we will discuss with you an arrangement for paying the arrears by instalments. If we cannot do that or if you fail to keep to a payment agreement, we will take further action to recover the debt.

We have a dedicated Rent Officer, ready to help, if you live in one of our properties. It is important that they are kept informed.

Home > Housing > Council housing tenants > Rent and rent arrears Rent and rent arrears You can pay your rent by monthly direct debit to make payment more convenient. We offer a choice of payment dates for either the 1st or the 15th of the month. Simply download a Direct Debit mandate form, complete the relevant details and then send it back to us. You should allow at least 15 working days for the direct debit to become effective. Direct debit is a safe and secure way to pay. Don’t forget to pay your rent in the period between submitting your direct debit form and the date that your first direct debit is due. Other ways to pay your rent Rent arrears You must keep your Rent Officer informed of any difficulties you have in paying your rent. We will always try and help you or offer advice and refer you to where to go for help or addition support. If you ignore letters sent or contact made from our officers, or bury your head in the sand, you could end up loosing your home. If you do not pay your rent, you cannot keep your home. However, at all stages we want to avoid taking legal action against you, and we will discuss with you an arrangement for paying the arrears by instalments. If we cannot do that or if you fail to keep to a payment agreement, we will take further action to recover the debt. The important thing is to get advice before rent arrears become too large. If you do not deal with the debt it is probable that your Rent Officer will take action through the court. Last year we evicted 15 tenants for rent arrears, so it is important to understand that it is a sanction that the council will use. Nine reasons not to fall behind with your rent The council’s Rent Enforcement Team, through the County Court, will start legal action You risk eviction from your home You will have to pay the additional costs of any County Court hearing You will not have any improvements carried out on your home A Possession Order can affect your credit rating You will not be able to complete a mutual exchange or transfer You could be prevented from buying your home in the future If you are evicted from your home, the council has no statutory duty to rehome you We will use debt recovery agencies to trace you to pay your outstanding debts. Where to seek advice Free, independent advice can be sought from the following organisations: Citizens Advice Bureau – (look under ‘counselling’ in the Yellow Pages for your local office) National Debtline – telephone 0800 8084000 Consumer Credit Counselling Services (CCCS) – telephone 0800 0279595 We have a dedicated Rent Officer, ready to help, if you live in one of our properties. It is important that they are kept informed. In this section Being offered a council property Rent and rent arrears Garage lettings Housing help eligibility How to pay your rent Ending a council tenancy Housing Officers Exchanging your council home Council property repairs Untidy gardens Right to Buy Squatters and unauthorised occupants Tenant’s Handbook and Repairs Charter Tenant involvement Tenants Magazine Contact us.

Rent and rent arrears You can pay your rent by monthly direct debit to make payment more convenient. We offer a choice of payment dates for either the 1st or the 15th of the month. Simply download a Direct Debit mandate form, complete the relevant details and then send it back to us. You should allow at least 15 working days for the direct debit to become effective. Direct debit is a safe and secure way to pay. Don’t forget to pay your rent in the period between submitting your direct debit form and the date that your first direct debit is due. Other ways to pay your rent Rent arrears You must keep your Rent Officer informed of any difficulties you have in paying your rent. We will always try and help you or offer advice and refer you to where to go for help or addition support. If you ignore letters sent or contact made from our officers, or bury your head in the sand, you could end up loosing your home. If you do not pay your rent, you cannot keep your home. However, at all stages we want to avoid taking legal action against you, and we will discuss with you an arrangement for paying the arrears by instalments. If we cannot do that or if you fail to keep to a payment agreement, we will take further action to recover the debt. The important thing is to get advice before rent arrears become too large. If you do not deal with the debt it is probable that your Rent Officer will take action through the court. Last year we evicted 15 tenants for rent arrears, so it is important to understand that it is a sanction that the council will use. Nine reasons not to fall behind with your rent The council’s Rent Enforcement Team, through the County Court, will start legal action You risk eviction from your home You will have to pay the additional costs of any County Court hearing You will not have any improvements carried out on your home A Possession Order can affect your credit rating You will not be able to complete a mutual exchange or transfer You could be prevented from buying your home in the future If you are evicted from your home, the council has no statutory duty to rehome you We will use debt recovery agencies to trace you to pay your outstanding debts. Where to seek advice Free, independent advice can be sought from the following organisations: Citizens Advice Bureau – (look under ‘counselling’ in the Yellow Pages for your local office) National Debtline – telephone 0800 8084000 Consumer Credit Counselling Services (CCCS) – telephone 0800 0279595 We have a dedicated Rent Officer, ready to help, if you live in one of our properties. It is important that they are kept informed. In this section Being offered a council property Rent and rent arrears Garage lettings Housing help eligibility How to pay your rent Ending a council tenancy Housing Officers Exchanging your council home Council property repairs Untidy gardens Right to Buy Squatters and unauthorised occupants Tenant’s Handbook and Repairs Charter Tenant involvement Tenants Magazine Contact us.

Rent and rent arrears You can pay your rent by monthly direct debit to make payment more convenient. We offer a choice of payment dates for either the 1st or the 15th of the month. Simply download a Direct Debit mandate form, complete the relevant details and then send it back to us. You should allow at least 15 working days for the direct debit to become effective. Direct debit is a safe and secure way to pay. Don’t forget to pay your rent in the period between submitting your direct debit form and the date that your first direct debit is due. Other ways to pay your rent Rent arrears You must keep your Rent Officer informed of any difficulties you have in paying your rent. We will always try and help you or offer advice and refer you to where to go for help or addition support. If you ignore letters sent or contact made from our officers, or bury your head in the sand, you could end up loosing your home. If you do not pay your rent, you cannot keep your home. However, at all stages we want to avoid taking legal action against you, and we will discuss with you an arrangement for paying the arrears by instalments. If we cannot do that or if you fail to keep to a payment agreement, we will take further action to recover the debt. The important thing is to get advice before rent arrears become too large. If you do not deal with the debt it is probable that your Rent Officer will take action through the court. Last year we evicted 15 tenants for rent arrears, so it is important to understand that it is a sanction that the council will use. Nine reasons not to fall behind with your rent The council’s Rent Enforcement Team, through the County Court, will start legal action You risk eviction from your home You will have to pay the additional costs of any County Court hearing You will not have any improvements carried out on your home A Possession Order can affect your credit rating You will not be able to complete a mutual exchange or transfer You could be prevented from buying your home in the future If you are evicted from you

Reference

Arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrears>.

Clarion Housing 2019, Falling into arrears | Clarion Housing, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.myclarionhousing.com/your-home/rent-and-service-charges/falling_into_arrears/>.

Dealing with rent arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/housing/renting-privately/during-your-tenancy/dealing-with-rent-arrears/>.

Eviction for rent arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.mygov.scot/eviction-council-tenants/eviction-for-rent-arrears/>.

Help with Rent Arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://scotland.shelter.org.uk/get_advice/advice_topics/paying_for_a_home/rent_arrears>.

How to Gain Possession and Evict a Tenant for Rent Arrears … 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://blog.openrent.co.uk/how-to-gain-possession-evict-tenant-rent-arrears/>.

Money in an emergency 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.gingerbread.org.uk/information/managing-money-and-debt/money-in-an-emergency/>.

Nuneaton & Bedworth 2019, Revenue Enforcement Team | Housing rent arrears | Nuneaton …, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.nuneatonandbedworth.gov.uk/info/20017/rents/155/housing_rent_arrears/2>.

Regenda 2019, About rent arrears | Regenda, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.regenda.org.uk/about-rent-arrears>.

Rent Arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <http://www.moray.gov.uk/moray_standard/page_41536.html>.

Rent and rent arrears » East Suffolk Council 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.eastsuffolk.gov.uk/housing/council-housing/rent-and-rent-arrears/>.

Rent arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.aberdeenshire.gov.uk/housing/tenant-information/rent-and-service-charges/rent-arrears/>.

Rent arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.bpha.org.uk/rent-arrears/>.

Rent arrears 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/debt-and-money/rent-arrears/>.

Rent arrears and advice 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.pkc.gov.uk/article/14036/Rent-arrears-and-advice>.

Rent arrears | nidirect 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/rent-arrears>.

Universal credit ‘forces tenants into rent arrears’ 2019, Viewed 4 December 2019, <https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49439699>.

 

Leave a Reply